CORE 3 MUSCULOSKELETAL RESEARCHERS

Core 3 Musculoskeletal Researchers2020-08-25T15:55:40+00:00

Below is a list of multidisciplinary Core competencies that support the breadth of Regenerative Rehabilitation research. Select one to learn about AR3T’s researchers with expertise in that area. Learn more about collaborative projects, consultations and sabbatical experiences that are available through the AR3T resource center here.

Core 3: Rehabilitation & Mechanosensitive Biomarkers

Musculoskeletal (hard and soft tissue) researchers:

  • LeBrasseur Laboratory: Dr. Nathan LeBrasseur’s laboratory studies the genetic and signaling pathways influencing skeletal muscle growth and metabolism, and how their manipulation affects these physiological processes. Dr. Nathan LeBrasseur utilizes murine models to investigate age-related declines in muscle regeneration following injury.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Sowa Laboratory: Using her background in biochemistry, Dr. Gwendolyn Sowa currently performs molecular laboratory based, translational, and clinical research, investigating the effect of motion on inflammatory pathways and the beneficial effects of exercise. She is Co-Director of the Ferguson Laboratory for Orthopaedic and Spine Research, a 3000 square foot laboratory fully equipped to perform molecular assays including gene expression analysis, protein analysis, cell and organ culture, histology, and cellular and spinal biomechanical testing.
  • George Laboratory: Paul George’s laboratory focuses on applying biomaterials to interact with the nervous system in new ways and determining important mechanisms of neural recovery.  Electrical stimulation is being studied as a potential mechanism for manipulating stem cells in vivo. Through the use of engineered biomaterials, he hopes to create the optimal environment for neural recovery.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Smith Laboratory: Jay Smith studies the clinical applications of musculoskeletal ultrasound for diagnostic and interventional procedures. He also studies regenerative medicine approaches in combination with ultrasound to enhance patient care including delivery of platelet rich plasma, bone marrow concentrate and other Orthobiologic agents into joints and soft tissues. Multiple studies are examining the outcomes of treatments using autologous, culture expanded adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells. He also has expertise in shoulder and elbow biomechanics.
  • Watkins Laboratory: Dr. Simon Watkins is the founder and director of the Center for Biologic Imaging at the University of Pittsburgh and a member of the Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Sowa Laboratory: Using her background in biochemistry, Dr. Gwendolyn Sowa currently performs molecular laboratory based, translational, and clinical research, investigating the effect of motion on inflammatory pathways and the beneficial effects of exercise. She is Co-Director of the Ferguson Laboratory for Orthopaedic and Spine Research, a 3000 square foot laboratory fully equipped to perform molecular assays including gene expression analysis, protein analysis, cell and organ culture, histology, and cellular and spinal biomechanical testing.
  • Sowa Laboratory: Using her background in biochemistry, Dr. Gwendolyn Sowa currently performs molecular laboratory based, translational, and clinical research, investigating the effect of motion on inflammatory pathways and the beneficial effects of exercise. She is Co-Director of the Ferguson Laboratory for Orthopaedic and Spine Research, a 3000 square foot laboratory fully equipped to perform molecular assays including gene expression analysis, protein analysis, cell and organ culture, histology, and cellular and spinal biomechanical testing.