CORE 2 CNS/PNS RESEARCHERS

Core 2 CNS/PNS Researchers2018-09-19T15:35:28+00:00

Below is a list of multidisciplinary Core competencies that support the breadth of Regenerative Rehabilitation research. Select one to learn about AR3T’s researchers with expertise in that area. Learn more about collaborative projects, consultations and sabbatical experiences that are available through the AR3T resource center here.

Core 2: Mechanotransductive Methods

Central and peripheral nervous system researchers:

  • Boninger Laboratory: Dr. Michael Boninger’s research efforts at both Pitt and the VA focus on technologies to improve the lives of individuals with spinal cord injury and other disabilities. His teams wheelchair work – conducted primarily at Pittsburgh Human Engineering Research Laboratories, where he is medical director – has led to patents for devices used throughout the world. In addition, his team discovered a link between how a person propels a manual wheelchair and his or her risk of injuries, such as rotator cuff tears.
  • Delp Laboratory: Dr. Scott Delp has transformed the field of biomechanics by creating highly accurate computer models of musculoskeletal structures and providing them to researchers worldwide using a software system (OpenSim) that he and his team developed. Delp and colleagues have developed novel microendoscopes that allow realtime in vivo imaging of human muscle microstructure and have pioneered the use of optogenetics to control activity in the peripheral nervous system leading to important inventions for treating paralysis, spasticity and pain.
  • Windebank/ Scarisbrick Laboratory: The laboratories of Drs. Isobel Scarisbrick and Anthony Windebank have a special interest in the use of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Their translational work spans murine to clinical models.
  • Delp Laboratory: Dr. Scott Delp has transformed the field of biomechanics by creating highly accurate computer models of musculoskeletal structures and providing them to researchers worldwide using a software system (OpenSim) that he and his team developed. Delp and colleagues have developed novel microendoscopes that allow realtime in vivo imaging of human muscle microstructure and have pioneered the use of optogenetics to control activity in the peripheral nervous system leading to important inventions for treating paralysis, spasticity and pain.
  • Watkins Laboratory: Dr. Simon Watkins is the founder and director of the Center for Biologic Imaging at the University of Pittsburgh and a member of the Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.
  • Windebank/ Scarisbrick Laboratory: The laboratories of Drs. Isobel Scarisbrick and Anthony Windebank have a special interest in the use of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Their translational work spans murine to clinical models.