CORE 2 MUSCULOSKELETAL RESEARCHERS

Core 2 Musculoskeletal Researchers2018-09-19T15:36:09+00:00

Below is a list of multidisciplinary Core competencies that support the breadth of Regenerative Rehabilitation research. Select one to learn about AR3T’s researchers with expertise in that area. Learn more about collaborative projects, consultations and sabbatical experiences that are available through the AR3T resource center here.

Core 2: Mechanotransductive Methods

Musculoskeletal (hard and soft tissue) researchers:

  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Wagner Laboratory: The primary research interests of Dr. William Wagner’s Laboratory at the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine are in the area of cardiovascular engineering with projects that address medical device biocompatibility and design, tissue engineering, and targeted imaging. Dr. Wagner’s laboratory brings expertise in structural mechanics for the assessment of tissue biophysical properties.
  • Ambrosio Laboratory: Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio’s research has the long-term goal of developing Regenerative Rehabilitation approaches to improve the skeletal muscle healing and functional recovery. Her laboratory uses murine and human models to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which targeted and specific mechanotransductive signals can be used to enhance donor and/or host stem cell functionality.
  • Boninger Laboratory: Dr. Michael Boninger’s research efforts at both Pitt and the VA focus on technologies to improve the lives of individuals with spinal cord injury and other disabilities. His teams wheelchair work – conducted primarily at Pittsburgh Human Engineering Research Laboratories, where he is medical director – has led to patents for devices used throughout the world. In addition, his team discovered a link between how a person propels a manual wheelchair and his or her risk of injuries, such as rotator cuff tears.
  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Ambrosio Laboratory: Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio’s research has the long-term goal of developing Regenerative Rehabilitation approaches to improve the skeletal muscle healing and functional recovery. Her laboratory uses murine and human models to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which targeted and specific mechanotransductive signals can be used to enhance donor and/or host stem cell functionality.
  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Wang Laboratory: Dr. James H-C. Wang’s laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the development of tendinopathy using in vitro and in vivo model systems, and enhancing the biological and biomechanical properties of healing tendons and ligaments using functional tissue engineering approaches. Dr. Wang is also interested in understanding how mechanical forces are transmitted to cells and translated into anabolic or catabolic responses. Currently, his major research effort is on tendon stem cell mechanobiology and on the use of platelet-rich plasma to enhance the healing of injured tendons.
  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Watkins Laboratory: Dr. Simon Watkins is the founder and director of the Center for Biologic Imaging at the University of Pittsburgh and a member of the Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.
  • Ambrosio Laboratory: Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio’s research has the long-term goal of developing Regenerative Rehabilitation approaches to improve the skeletal muscle healing and functional recovery. Her laboratory uses murine and human models to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which targeted and specific mechanotransductive signals can be used to enhance donor and/or host stem cell functionality.
  • Boninger Laboratory: Dr. Michael Boninger’s research efforts at both Pitt and the VA focus on technologies to improve the lives of individuals with spinal cord injury and other disabilities. His teams wheelchair work – conducted primarily at Pittsburgh Human Engineering Research Laboratories, where he is medical director – has led to patents for devices used throughout the world. In addition, his team discovered a link between how a person propels a manual wheelchair and his or her risk of injuries, such as rotator cuff tears.