CORE 1 CNS/PNS RESEARCHERS

Core 1 CNS/PNS Researchers2018-09-19T15:33:53+00:00

Below is a list of multidisciplinary Core competencies that support the breadth of Regenerative Rehabilitation research. Select one to learn about AR3T’s researchers with expertise in that area. Learn more about collaborative projects, consultations and sabbatical experiences that are available through the AR3T resource center here.

Core 1: Cellular Therapeutics/Tissue Engineering

Central and peripheral nervous system researchers:

  • Modo Laboratory: Dr. Michael Modo’s research interests include: neuroimaging, including molecular and cellular MRI; stem cell therapy, such as neural stem cells, stem cell repair, stem cell differentiation, immunological aspects of cell therapy; functional DNA behavioral rodent assessment; histology; and disease models, including stroke, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s. Dr. Modo has research interest in the synergistic effect of stem cell transplantation and exercise to promote functional recovery after stroke.
  • Zoldan Laboratory: Dr. Janet Zoldan, a bioengineer, focuses on human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model system to explore key principles underlying tissue formation processes by integrating and applying materials and stem cell bioengineering. Understanding this process and controlling it is critical for treating a broad spectrum of pathological conditions. Current research includes using protein delivery to direct iPSCs differentiation into the cardiovascular lineages, mimicking the cardiac niche, and developing iPSC-derived tissue constructs for cardiac tissue repair and replacement.
  • Noble-Haeusslein Laboratory: Dr. Linda Noble-Haeusslein’s research focuses on neurotrauma. She focuses on perspectives of developing clinically relevant rodent models of brain and spinal cord injuries including state-of-the art quantifiable assays of motor/sensory and cognitive functions to assess long-term neurological function; identification of pharmacological and stem cell based therapies for restoring function; and synergism between these therapies and rehabilitation in enhancing recovery.
  • Scarisbrick Laboratory: The laboratory of Dr. Isobel Scarisbrick has a special interest in the use of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Her translational work spans murine to clinical models.
  • Windebank Laboratory: Dr. Anthony Windebank’s lab has a special interest in the use of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate peripheral nerve and spinal cord. His translational work spans murine to clinical models.
  • Zoldan Laboratory: Dr. Janet Zoldan, a bioengineer, focuses on human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model system to explore key principles underlying tissue formation processes by integrating and applying materials and stem cell bioengineering. Understanding this process and controlling it is critical for treating a broad spectrum of pathological conditions. Current research includes using protein delivery to direct iPSCs differentiation into the cardiovascular lineages, mimicking the cardiac niche, and developing iPSC-derived tissue constructs for cardiac tissue repair and replacement.
  • Heilshorn Laboratory: Ongoing investigations from Dr. Sarah Heilshorn’s laboratory include Implantable materials for regenerative medicine, Injectable materials for cell transplantation, and Biotemplates for inorganic nanoparticles. Specifically, Dr. Heilshorn and her group are designing a new family of biomaterials that are made entirely of engineered proteins. Current systems under study include neuronal, cardiac, vascular, and bone tissues amongst others. In addition, the Heilshorn laboratory has research interests in the development of functional cell delivery materials to protect cells from mechanical stress during injection, localize them to the transplantation site, and direct their organization and differentiation in vivo thinning and self-healing.
  • Noble-Haeusslein Laboratory: Dr. Linda Noble-Haeusslein’s research focuses on neurotrauma. She focuses on perspectives of developing clinically relevant rodent models of brain and spinal cord injuries including state-of-the art quantifiable assays of motor/sensory and cognitive functions to assess long-term neurological function; identification of pharmacological and stem cell based therapies for restoring function; and synergism between these therapies and rehabilitation in enhancing recovery.
  • Modo Laboratory: Dr. Michael Modo’s research interests include: neuroimaging, including molecular and cellular MRI; stem cell therapy, such as neural stem cells, stem cell repair, stem cell differentiation, immunological aspects of cell therapy; functional DNA behavioral rodent assessment; histology; and disease models, including stroke, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s. Dr. Modo has research interest in the synergistic effect of stem cell transplantation and exercise to promote functional recovery after stroke.
  • Watkins Laboratory: Dr. Simon Watkins is the founder and director of the Center for Biologic Imaging at the University of Pittsburgh and a member of the Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.
  • Scarisbrick Laboratory: The laboratory of Dr. Isobel Scarisbrick has a special interest in the use of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Her translational work spans murine to clinical models.
  • Noble-Haeusslein Laboratory: Dr. Linda Noble-Haeusslein’s research focuses on neurotrauma. She focuses on perspectives of developing clinically relevant rodent models of brain and spinal cord injuries including state-of-the art quantifiable assays of motor/sensory and cognitive functions to assess long-term neurological function; identification of pharmacological and stem cell based therapies for restoring function; and synergism between these therapies and rehabilitation in enhancing recovery.