CORE 1 MUSCULOSKELETAL RESEARCHERS

Core 1 Musculoskeletal Researchers2018-09-19T15:34:26+00:00

Below is a list of multidisciplinary Core competencies that support the breadth of Regenerative Rehabilitation research. Select one to learn about AR3T’s researchers with expertise in that area. Learn more about collaborative projects, consultations and sabbatical experiences that are available through the AR3T resource center here.

Core 1: Cellular Therapeutics/Tissue Engineering

Musculoskeletal (hard and soft tissue) researchers:

  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Ambrosio Laboratory: Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio’s research has the long-term goal of developing Regenerative Rehabilitation approaches to improve the skeletal muscle healing and functional recovery. Her laboratory uses murine and human models to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which targeted and specific mechanotransductive signals can be used to enhance donor and/or host stem cell functionality.
  • LeBrasseur Laboratory: Dr. Nathan LeBrasseur’s laboratory studies the genetic and signaling pathways influencing skeletal muscle growth and metabolism, and how their manipulation affects these physiological processes. Dr. Nathan LeBrasseur utilizes murine models to investigate age-related declines in muscle regeneration following injury.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Sowa Laboratory: Using her background in biochemistry, Dr. Gwendolyn Sowa currently performs molecular laboratory based, translational, and clinical research, investigating the effect of motion on inflammatory pathways and the beneficial effects of exercise. She is Co-Director of the Ferguson Laboratory for Orthopaedic and Spine Research, a 3000 square foot laboratory fully equipped to perform molecular assays including gene expression analysis, protein analysis, cell and organ culture, histology, and cellular and spinal biomechanical testing.
  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Ambrosio Laboratory: Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio’s research has the long-term goal of developing Regenerative Rehabilitation approaches to improve the skeletal muscle healing and functional recovery. Her laboratory uses murine and human models to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which targeted and specific mechanotransductive signals can be used to enhance donor and/or host stem cell functionality.
  • Evans Laboratory: Dr. Christopher Evans utilizes his background in cell and molecular biology to solve clinical problems involving bones and joints. Current areas of focus include: gene therapy for arthritis, which is currently at an advanced, preclinical stage; bone healing and cartilage regeneration, in which he implements various gene, cell and mechanics-based strategies to restore tissue health; and investigations into the influence of inflammation on bone healing and cartilage regeneration.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Wang Laboratory: Dr. James H-C. Wang’s laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the development of tendinopathy using in vitro and in vivo model systems, and enhancing the biological and biomechanical properties of healing tendons and ligaments using functional tissue engineering approaches. Dr. Wang is also interested in understanding how mechanical forces are transmitted to cells and translated into anabolic or catabolic responses. Currently, his major research effort is on tendon stem cell mechanobiology and on the use of platelet-rich plasma to enhance the healing of injured tendons.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Evans Laboratory: Dr. Christopher Evans utilizes his background in cell and molecular biology to solve clinical problems involving bones and joints. Current areas of focus include: gene therapy for arthritis, which is currently at an advanced, preclinical stage; bone healing and cartilage regeneration, in which he implements various gene, cell and mechanics-based strategies to restore tissue health; and investigations into the influence of inflammation on bone healing and cartilage regeneration.
  • Heilshorn Laboratory: Ongoing investigations from Dr. Sarah Heilshorn’s laboratory include Implantable materials for regenerative medicine, Injectable materials for cell transplantation, and Biotemplates for inorganic nanoparticles. Specifically, Dr. Heilshorn and her group are designing a new family of biomaterials that are made entirely of engineered proteins. Current systems under study include neuronal, cardiac, vascular, and bone tissues amongst others. In addition, the Heilshorn laboratory has research interests in the development of functional cell delivery materials to protect cells from mechanical stress during injection, localize them to the transplantation site, and direct their organization and differentiation in vivo thinning and self-healing.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Tuan Laboratory: Dr. Rocky Tuan directs a multidisciplinary research program, which focuses on the biological activities that are important for the development, growth, function, and health of musculoskeletal tissues and the utilization of this knowledge to develop technologies that will regenerate and/or restore function to diseased and damaged skeletal tissues. Ongoing research projects are directed towards skeletal development, stem cells, growth factor signaling, bone-biomaterial interaction, extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interaction, nanotechnology, biomaterials, 3D printing, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Watkins Laboratory: Dr. Simon Watkins is the founder and director of the Center for Biologic Imaging at the University of Pittsburgh and a member of the Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.
  • Rando Laboratory: Dr. Thomas Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions.
  • Sowa Laboratory: Using her background in biochemistry, Dr. Gwendolyn Sowa currently performs molecular laboratory based, translational, and clinical research, investigating the effect of motion on inflammatory pathways and the beneficial effects of exercise. She is Co-Director of the Ferguson Laboratory for Orthopaedic and Spine Research, a 3000 square foot laboratory fully equipped to perform molecular assays including gene expression analysis, protein analysis, cell and organ culture, histology, and cellular and spinal biomechanical testing.
  • Ambrosio Laboratory: Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio’s research has the long-term goal of developing Regenerative Rehabilitation approaches to improve the skeletal muscle healing and functional recovery. Her laboratory uses murine and human models to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which targeted and specific mechanotransductive signals can be used to enhance donor and/or host stem cell functionality.
  • Noble-Haeusslein Laboratory: Dr. Linda Noble-Haeusslein’s research focuses on neurotrauma. She focuses on perspectives of developing clinically relevant rodent models of brain and spinal cord injuries including state-of-the art quantifiable assays of motor/sensory and cognitive functions to assess long-term neurological function; identification of pharmacological and stem cell based therapies for restoring function; and synergism between these therapies and rehabilitation in enhancing recovery.
  • Sowa Laboratory: Using her background in biochemistry, Dr. Gwendolyn Sowa currently performs molecular laboratory based, translational, and clinical research, investigating the effect of motion on inflammatory pathways and the beneficial effects of exercise. She is Co-Director of the Ferguson Laboratory for Orthopaedic and Spine Research, a 3000 square foot laboratory fully equipped to perform molecular assays including gene expression analysis, protein analysis, cell and organ culture, histology, and cellular and spinal biomechanical testing.