Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD

Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD2018-05-03T20:46:16+00:00

Project Description

Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD

Principal Investigator; Co-Director of the Cellular Therapies/Tissue Engineering Core, and Stanford Site Lead

Dr. Rando is a Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University. He is Chief of the Neurology Service at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, director of the Rehabilitation R&D program, and PI on the Innovative Rehabilitative Strategies for Muscle Dysfunction VA Research Enhancement Awards Program (REAP). He is an adjunct faculty member in the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Rando received a Bachelor of Arts, MD and a PhD from Harvard University. He completed his residency in Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, where he served as Chief Resident. From 1991-1994, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology at Stanford University.

Dr. Rando’s research has focused on the structure and function of skeletal muscle with particular emphasis on stem cell biology and regenerative potential of muscle tissue in the setting of aging, injury, and disease. His laboratory has more recently expanded into the area of tissue engineering, with an emphasis on Regenerative Rehabilitation, exploring the effects of exercise and physical activity on muscle regenerative and reparative functions. Dr. Rando has been recognized as leader in scientific fields ranging from the biology of aging, to stem cell biology, to muscular dystrophy. For his seminal work on systemic aging, he received the prestigious NIH Director’s Pioneer Award in 2005, and he recently was the recipient of a Transformative Research Award from the NIH for studies of the mechanisms of enhancement of cognition by physical activity such as exercise. He has received numerous awards, including a Paul Beeson Physician Faculty Scholar in Aging, a Senior Scholar Award from the Ellison Medical Foundation, and a “Breakthroughs in Gerontology” Award from the American Federation for Aging Research.